Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A Scandal in Bohemia. Part 2

A Scandal in Bohemia (by Arthur Conan Doyle)

Dr. Watson recounts an adventure that started on 20 March 1888. While the currently married Watson is paying Holmes a visit, a masked visitor arrives, introducing himself as Count Kramm, an agent for a wealthy client. Holmes quickly deduces that the visitor is in fact Wilhelm Gottsreich Sigismond von Ormstein, Grand Duke of Cassel-Felstein and the hereditary King of Bohemia. Realizing Holmes has seen through his guise, the King admits this and tears off his mask.

Arthur Doyle: A Scandal in Bohemia

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Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

A Scandal in Bohemia

To Sherlock Holmes she is always THE woman. I have seldom heard him mention her under any other name. In his eyes she eclipses and predominates the whole of her sex. It was not that he felt any emotion akin to love for Irene Adler. All emotions, and that one particularly, were abhorrent to his cold, precise but admirably balanced mind. He was, I take it, the most perfect reasoning and observing machine that the world has seen, but as a lover he would have placed himself in a false position. He never spoke of the softer passions, save with a gibe and a sneer. They were admirable things for the observer — excellent for drawing the veil from men’s motives and actions. But for the trained teasoner to admit such intrusions into his own delicate and finely adjusted temperament was to introduce a distracting factor which might throw a doubt upon all his mental results. Grit in a sensitive instrument, or a crack in one of his own high-power lenses, would not be more disturbing than a strong emotion in a nature such as his. And yet there was but one woman to him, and that woman was the late Irene Adler, of dubious and questionable memory.

I had seen little of Holmes lately. My marriage had drifted us away from each other. My own complete happiness, and the home-centred interests which rise up around the man who first finds himself master of his own establishment, were sufficient to absorb all my attention, while Holmes, who loathed every form of society with his whole Bohemian soul, remained in our lodgings in Baker Street, buried among his old books, and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition, the drowsiness of the drug, and the fierce energy of his own keen nature. He was still, as ever, deeply attracted by the study of crime, and occupied his immense faculties and extraordinary powers of observation in following out those clews, and clearing up those mysteries which had been abandoned as hopeless by the official police. From time to time I heard some vague account of his doings: of his summons to Odessa in the case of the Trepoff murder, of his clearing up of the singular tragedy of the Atkinson brothers at Trincomalee, and finally of the mission which he had accomplished so delicately and successfully for the reigning family of Holland. Beyond these signs of his activity, however, which I merely shared with all the readers of the daily press, I knew little of my former friend and companion.

One night — it was on the twentieth of March, 1888—I was returning from a journey to a patient (for I had now returned to civil practice), when my way led me through Baker Street. As I passed the well-remembered door, which must always be associated in my mind with my wooing, and with the dark incidents of the Study in Scarlet, I was seized with a keen desire to see Holmes again, and to know how he was employing his extraordinary powers. His rooms were brilliantly lit, and, even as I looked up, I saw his tall, spare figure pass twice in a dark silhouette against the blind. He was pacing the room swiftly, eagerly, with his head sunk upon his chest and his hands clasped behind him. To me, who knew his every mood and habit, his attitude and manner told their own story. He was at work again. He had risen out of his drug-created dreams and was hot upon the scent of some new problem. I rang the bell and was shown up to the chamber which had formerly been in part my own.

His manner was not effusive. It seldom was; but he was glad, I think, to see me. With hardly a word spoken, but with a kindly eye, he waved me to an armchair, threw across his case of cigars, and indicated a spirit case and a gasogene in the corner. Then he stood before the fire and looked me over in his singular introspective fashion.

“Wedlock suits you,” he remarked. “I think, Watson, that you have put on seven and a half pounds since I saw you.”

“Seven!” I answered.

“Indeed, I should have thought a little more. Just a trifle more, I fancy, Watson. And in practice again, I observe. You did not tell me that you intended to go into harness.”

“Then, how do you know?”

“I see it, I deduce it. How do I know that you have been getting yourself very wet lately, and that you have a most clumsy and careless servant girl?”

“My dear Holmes,” said I, “this is too much. You would certainly have been burned, had you lived a few centuries ago. It is true that I had a country walk on Thursday and came home in a dreadful mess, but as I have changed my clothes I can’t imagine how you deduce it. As to Mary Jane, she is incorrigible, and my wife has given her notice, but there, again, I fail to see how you work it out.”

He chuckled to himself and rubbed his long, nervous hands together.

“It is simplicity itself,” said he; “my eyes tell me that on the inside of your left shoe, just where the firelight strikes it, the leather is scored by six almost parallel cuts. Obviously they have been caused by someone who has very carelessly scraped round the edges of the sole in order to remove crusted mud from it. Hence, you see, my double deduction that you had been out in vile weather, and that you had a particularly malignant boot-slitting specimen of the London slavey. As to your practice, if a gentleman walks into my rooms smelling of iodoform, with a black mark of nitrate of silver upon his right forefinger, and a bulge on the right side of his top-hat to show where he has secreted his stethoscope, I must be dull, indeed, if I do not pronounce him to be an active member of the medical profession.”

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I could not help laughing at the ease with which he explained his process of deduction. “When I hear you give your reasons,” I remarked, “the thing always appears to me to be so ridiculously simple that I could easily do it myself, though at each successive instance of your reasoning I am baffled until you explain your process. And yet I believe that my eyes are as good as yours.”

“Quite so,” he answered, lighting a cigarette, and throwing himself down into an armchair. “You see, but you do not observe. The distinction is clear. For example, you have frequently seen the steps which lead up from the hall to this room.”

“Well, some hundreds of times.”

“Then how many are there?”

“How many? I don’t know.”

“Quite so! You have not observed. And yet you have seen. That is just my point. Now, I know that there are seventeen steps, because I have both seen and observed. By-the-way, since you are interested in these little problems, and since you are good enough to chronicle one or two of my trifling experiences, you may be interested in this.” He threw over a sheet of thick, pink-tinted note-paper which had been lying open upon the table. “It came by the last post,” said he. “Read it aloud.”

The note was undated, and without either signature or address.

“There will call upon you to-night, at a quarter to eight o’clock,” it said, “a gentleman who desires to consult you upon a matter of the very deepest moment. Your recent services to one of the royal houses of Europe have shown that you are one who may safely be trusted with matters which are of an importance which can hardly be exaggerated. This account of you we have from all quarters received. Be in your chamber then at that hour, and do not take it amiss if your visitor wear a mask.

“This is indeed a mystery,” I remarked. “What do you imagine that it means?”

“I have no data yet. It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts. But the note itself. What do you deduce from it?”

Sherlock Holmes — A Scandal In Bohemia & Other Tales — EP Arthur Conan Doyle

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Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A Scandal in Bohemia. Part 2

Артур Конан Дойл

Скандал в Богемии

Для Шерлока Холмса она всегда оставалась «Этой Женщиной». Я редко слышал, чтобы он называл ее каким-либо другим именем. В его глазах она затмевала всех представительниц своего пола. Не то чтобы он испытывал к Ирэн Адлер какое-либо чувство, близкое к любви. Все чувства, и особенно любовь, были ненавистны его холодному, точному, но удивительно уравновешенному уму. По-моему, он был самой совершенной мыслящей и наблюдающей машиной, какую когда-либо видел мир; но в качестве влюбленного он оказался бы не на своем месте. Он всегда говорил о нежных чувствах не иначе, как с презрительной насмешкой, с издевкой. Нежные чувства были в его глазах великолепным объектом для наблюдения, превосходным средством сорвать покров с человеческих побуждений и дел. Но для изощренного мыслителя допустить такое вторжение чувства в свой утонченный и великолепно налаженный внутренний мир означало бы внести туда смятение, которое свело бы на нет все завоевания его мысли. Песчинка, попавшая в чувствительный инструмент, или трещина в одной из его могучих линз — вот что такое была бы любовь для такого человека, как Холмс. И все же для него существовала одна женщина, и этой женщиной была покойная Иран Адлер, особа весьма и весьма сомнительной репутации.

За последнее время я редко виделся с Холмсом — моя женитьба отдалила нас друг от друга. Моего личного безоблачного счастья и чисто семейных интересов, которые возникают у человека, когда он впервые становится господином собственного домашнего очага, было достаточно, чтобы поглотить все мое внимание. Между тем Холмс, ненавидевший своей цыганской душой всякую форму светской жизни, оставался жить в нашей квартире на Бейкер-стрит, окруженный грудами своих старых книг, чередуя недели увлечения кокаином с приступами честолюбия, дремотное состояние наркомана — с дикой энергией, присущей его натуре.

Как и прежде, он был глубоко увлечен расследованием преступлений. Он отдавал свои огромные способности и необычайный дар наблюдательности поискам нитей к выяснению тех тайн, которые официальной полицией были признаны непостижимыми. Время от времени до меня доходили смутные слухи о его делах: о том, что его вызывали в Одессу в связи с убийством Трепова, о том, что ему удалось пролить свет на загадочную трагедию братьев Аткинсон в Тринкомали, и, наконец, о поручении голландского королевского дома, выполненном им исключительно тонко и удачно.

Однако, помимо этих сведений о его деятельности, которые я так же, как и все читатели, черпал из газет, я мало знал о моем прежнем друге и товарище.

Однажды ночью — это было 20 марта 1888 года — я возвращался от пациента (так как теперь я вновь занялся частной практикой), и мой путь привел меня на Бейкер-стрит. Когда я проходил мимо хорошо знакомой двери, которая в моем уме навсегда связана с воспоминанием о времени моего сватовства и с мрачными событиями «Этюда в багровых тонах», меня охватило острое желание вновь увидеть Холмса и узнать, над какими проблемами нынче работает его замечательный ум. Его окна были ярко освещены, и, посмотрев вверх, я увидел его высокую, худощавую фигуру, которая дважды темным силуэтом промелькнула на опущенной шторе. Он быстро, стремительно ходил по комнате, низко опустив голову и заложив за спину руки. Мне, знавшему все его настроения и привычки, его ходьба из угла в угол и весь его внешний облик говорили о многом. Он вновь принялся за работу. Он стряхнул с себя навеянные наркотиками туманные грезы и распутывал нити какой-то новой загадки. Я позвонил, и меня проводили в комнату, которая когда-то была отчасти и моей.

Он встретил меня без восторженных излияний. Таким излияниям он предавался чрезвычайно редко, но, мне кажется, был рад моему приходу. Почти без слов, он приветливым жестом пригласил меня сесть, подвинул ко мне коробку сигар и указал на погребец, где хранилось вино. Затем он встал перед камином и оглядел меня своим особым, проницательным взглядом.

— Семейная жизнь вам на пользу, — заметил он. — Я думаю, Уотсон, что с тех пор, как я вас видел, вы пополнели на семь с половиной фунтов.

— Правда? Нет, нет, немного больше. Чуточку больше, уверяю вас. И снова практикуете, как я вижу. Вы мне не говорили, что собираетесь впрячься в работу.

— Так откуда же вы это знаете?

— Я вижу это, я делаю выводы. Например, откуда я знаю, что вы недавно сильно промокли и что ваша горничная большая неряха?

— Дорогой Холмс, — сказал я, — это уж чересчур. Вас несомненно сожгли бы на костре, если бы вы жили несколько веков назад. Правда, что в четверг мне пришлось быть за городом и я вернулся домой весь испачканный, но ведь я переменил костюм, так что от дождя не осталось следов. Что касается Мэри Джен, она и в самом деле неисправима, и жена уже предупредила, что хочет уволить ее. И все же я не понимаю, как вы догадались об этом.

Холмс тихо рассмеялся и потер свои длинные нервные руки.

— Проще простого! — сказал он. — Мои глаза уведомляют меня, что с внутренней стороны вашего левого башмака, как раз там, куда падает свет, на коже видны шесть почти параллельных царапин. Очевидно, царапины были сделаны кем-то, кто очень небрежно обтирал края подошвы, чтобы удалить засохшую грязь. Отсюда я, как видите, делаю двойной вывод, что вы выходили в дурную погоду и что у вас очень скверный образчик лондонской прислуги. А что касается вашей практики, — если в мою комнату входит джентльмен, пропахший йодоформом, если у него на указательном пальце правой руки черное пятно от азотной кислоты, а на цилиндре — шишка, указывающая, куда он запрятал свой стетоскоп, я должен быть совершенным глупцом, чтобы не признать в нем деятельного представителя врачебного мира.

Я не мог удержаться от смеха, слушая, с какой легкостью он объяснил мне путь своих умозаключений.

— Когда вы раскрываете свои соображения, — заметил я, — все кажется мне смехотворно простым, я и сам без труда мог бы все это сообразить. А в каждом новом случае я совершенно ошеломлен, пока вы не объясните мне ход ваших мыслей. Между тем я думаю, что зрение у меня не хуже вашего.

— Совершенно верно, — ответил Холмс, закуривая папиросу и вытягиваясь в кресле. — Вы смотрите, но вы не наблюдаете, а это большая разница. Например, вы часто видели ступеньки, ведущие из прихожей в эту комнату?

— Ну, несколько сот раз!

— Отлично. Сколько же там ступенек?

— Сколько? Не обратил внимания.

— Вот-вот, не обратили внимания. А между тем вы видели! В этом вся суть. Ну, а я знаю, что ступенек — семнадцать, потому что я и видел, и наблюдал. Кстати, вы ведь интересуетесь теми небольшими проблемами, в разрешении которых заключается мое ремесло, и даже были добры описать два-три из моих маленьких опытов. Поэтому вас может, пожалуй, заинтересовать вот это письмо.

Он бросил мне листок толстой розовой почтовой бумаги, валявшийся на столе.

— Получено только что, — сказал он. — Прочитайте-ка вслух.

Письмо было без даты, без подписи и без адреса.

«Сегодня вечером, без четверти восемь, — говорилось в записке, — к Вам придет джентльмен, который хочет получить у Вас консультацию по очень важному делу. Услуги, оказанные Вами недавно одному из королевских семейств Европы, показали, что Вам можно доверять дела чрезвычайной важности. Такой отзыв о Вас мы со всех сторон получали. Будьте дома в этот час и не подумайте ничего плохого, если Ваш посетитель будет в маске».

— Это в самом деле таинственно, — заметил я. — Как вы думаете, что все это значит?

— У меня пока нет никаких данных. Теоретизировать, не имея данных, опасно. Незаметно для себя человек начинает подтасовывать факты, чтобы подогнать их к своей теории, вместо того чтобы обосновывать теорию фактами. Но сама записка! Какие вы можете сделать выводы из записки?

Я тщательно осмотрел письмо и бумагу, на которой оно было написано.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A Scandal in Bohemia. Part 2

To Sherlock Holmes she is always THE woman. I have seldom heard him mention her under any other name. In his eyes she eclipses and predominates the whole of her sex. It was not that he felt any emotion akin to love for Irene Adler. All emotions, and that one particularly, were abhorrent to his cold, precise but admirably balanced mind. He was, I take it, the most perfect reasoning and observing machine that the world has seen, but as a lover he would have placed himself in a false position. He never spoke of the softer passions, save with a gibe and a sneer. They were admirable things for the observer — excellent for drawing the veil from men’s motives and actions. But for the trained teasoner to admit such intrusions into his own delicate and finely adjusted temperament was to introduce a distracting factor which might throw a doubt upon all his mental results. Grit in a sensitive instrument, or a crack in one of his own high-power lenses, would not be more disturbing than a strong emotion in a nature such as his. And yet there was but one woman to him, and that woman was the late Irene Adler, of dubious and questionable memory.

I had seen little of Holmes lately. My marriage had drifted us away from each other. My own complete happiness, and the home-centred interests which rise up around the man who first finds himself master of his own establishment, were sufficient to absorb all my attention, while Holmes, who loathed every form of society with his whole Bohemian soul, remained in our lodgings in Baker Street, buried among his old books, and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition, the drowsiness of the drug, and the fierce energy of his own keen nature. He was still, as ever, deeply attracted by the study of crime, and occupied his immense faculties and extraordinary powers of observation in following out those clews, and clearing up those mysteries which had been abandoned as hopeless by the official police. From time to time I heard some vague account of his doings: of his summons to Odessa in the case of the Trepoff murder, of his clearing up of the singular tragedy of the Atkinson brothers at Trincomalee, and finally of the mission which he had accomplished so delicately and successfully for the reigning family of Holland. Beyond these signs of his activity, however, which I merely shared with all the readers of the daily press, I knew little of my former friend and companion.

One night — it was on the twentieth of March, 1888—I was returning from a journey to a patient (for I had now returned to civil practice), when my way led me through Baker Street. As I passed the well-remembered door, which must always be associated in my mind with my wooing, and with the dark incidents of the Study in Scarlet, I was seized with a keen desire to see Holmes again, and to know how he was employing his extraordinary powers. His rooms were brilliantly lit, and, even as I looked up, I saw his tall, spare figure pass twice in a dark silhouette against the blind. He was pacing the room swiftly, eagerly, with his head sunk upon his chest and his hands clasped behind him. To me, who knew his every mood and habit, his attitude and manner told their own story. He was at work again. He had risen out of his drug-created dreams and was hot upon the scent of some new problem. I rang the bell and was shown up to the chamber which had formerly been in part my own.

His manner was not effusive. It seldom was; but he was glad, I think, to see me. With hardly a word spoken, but with a kindly eye, he waved me to an armchair, threw across his case of cigars, and indicated a spirit case and a gasogene in the corner. Then he stood before the fire and looked me over in his singular introspective fashion.

“Wedlock suits you,” he remarked. “I think, Watson, that you have put on seven and a half pounds since I saw you.”

“Seven!” I answered.

“Indeed, I should have thought a little more. Just a trifle more, I fancy, Watson. And in practice again, I observe. You did not tell me that you intended to go into harness.”

“Then, how do you know?”

“I see it, I deduce it. How do I know that you have been getting yourself very wet lately, and that you have a most clumsy and careless servant girl?”

“My dear Holmes,” said I, “this is too much. You would certainly have been burned, had you lived a few centuries ago. It is true that I had a country walk on Thursday and came home in a dreadful mess, but as I have changed my clothes I can’t imagine how you deduce it. As to Mary Jane, she is incorrigible, and my wife has given her notice, but there, again, I fail to see how you work it out.”

He chuckled to himself and rubbed his long, nervous hands together.

“It is simplicity itself,” said he; “my eyes tell me that on the inside of your left shoe, just where the firelight strikes it, the leather is scored by six almost parallel cuts. Obviously they have been caused by someone who has very carelessly scraped round the edges of the sole in order to remove crusted mud from it. Hence, you see, my double deduction that you had been out in vile weather, and that you had a particularly malignant boot-slitting specimen of the London slavey. As to your practice, if a gentleman walks into my rooms smelling of iodoform, with a black mark of nitrate of silver upon his right forefinger, and a bulge on the right side of his top-hat to show where he has secreted his stethoscope, I must be dull, indeed, if I do not pronounce him to be an active member of the medical profession.”

I could not help laughing at the ease with which he explained his process of deduction. “When I hear you give your reasons,” I remarked, “the thing always appears to me to be so ridiculously simple that I could easily do it myself, though at each successive instance of your reasoning I am baffled until you explain your process. And yet I believe that my eyes are as good as yours.”

“Quite so,” he answered, lighting a cigarette, and throwing himself down into an armchair. “You see, but you do not observe. The distinction is clear. For example, you have frequently seen the steps which lead up from the hall to this room.”

“Well, some hundreds of times.”

“Then how many are there?”

“How many? I don’t know.”

“Quite so! You have not observed. And yet you have seen. That is just my point. Now, I know that there are seventeen steps, because I have both seen and observed. By-the-way, since you are interested in these little problems, and since you are good enough to chronicle one or two of my trifling experiences, you may be interested in this.” He threw over a sheet of thick, pink-tinted note-paper which had been lying open upon the table. “It came by the last post,” said he. “Read it aloud.”

The note was undated, and without either signature or address.

“There will call upon you to-night, at a quarter to eight o’clock,” it said, “a gentleman who desires to consult you upon a matter of the very deepest moment. Your recent services to one of the royal houses of Europe have shown that you are one who may safely be trusted with matters which are of an importance which can hardly be exaggerated. This account of you we have from all quarters received. Be in your chamber then at that hour, and do not take it amiss if your visitor wear a mask.

“This is indeed a mystery,” I remarked. “What do you imagine that it means?”

“I have no data yet. It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts. But the note itself. What do you deduce from it?”

I carefully examined the writing, and the paper upon which it was written.

“The man who wrote it was presumably well to do,” I remarked, endeavoring to imitate my companion’s processes. “Such paper could not be bought under half a crown a packet. It is peculiarly strong and stiff.”

“Peculiar — that is the very word,” said Holmes. “It is not an English paper at all. Hold it up to the light.”

I did so, and saw a large “E” with a small “g,” a “P,” and a large “G” with a small “t” woven into the texture of the paper.

“What do you make of that?” asked Holmes.

“The name of the maker, no doubt; or his monogram, rather.”

“Not at all. The ‘G’ with the small ‘t’ stands for ‘Gesellschaft,’ which is the German for ‘Company.’ It is a customary contraction like our ‘Co.’ ‘P,’ of course, stands for ‘Papier.’ Now for the ‘Eg.’ Let us glance at our Continental Gazetteer.” He took down a heavy brown volume from his shelves. “Eglow, Eglonitz — here we are, Egria. It is in a German-speaking country — in Bohemia, not far from Carlsbad. ‘Remarkable as being the scene of the death of Wallenstein, and for its numerous glass-factories and paper-mills.’ Ha, ha, my boy, what do you make of that?” His eyes sparkled, and he sent up a great blue triumphant cloud from his cigarette.

“The paper was made in Bohemia,” I said.

“Precisely. And the man who wrote the note is a German. Do you note the peculiar construction of the sentence—’This account of you we have from all quarters received.’ A Frenchman or Russian could not have written that. It is the German who is so uncourteous to his verbs. It only remains, therefore, to discover what is wanted by this German who writes upon Bohemian paper and prefers wearing a mask to showing his face. And here he comes, if I am not mistaken, to resolve all our doubts.”

As he spoke there was the sharp sound of horses’ hoofs and grating wheels against the curb, followed by a sharp pull at the bell. Holmes whistled.

“A pair, by the sound,” said he. “Yes,” he continued, glancing out of the window. “A nice little brougham and a pair of beauties. A hundred and fifty guineas apiece. There’s money in this case, Watson, if there is nothing else.”

“I think that I had better go, Holmes.”

“Not a bit, Doctor. Stay where you are. I am lost without my Boswell. And this promises to be interesting. It would be a pity to miss it.”

“But your client—”

“Never mind him. I may want your help, and so may he. Here he comes. Sit down in that armchair, Doctor, and give us your best attention.”

A slow and heavy step, which had been heard upon the stairs and in the passage, paused immediately outside the door. Then there was a loud and authoritative tap.

“Come in!” said Holmes.

A man entered who could hardly have been less than six feet six inches in height, with the chest and limbs of a Hercules. His dress was rich with a richness which would, in England, be looked upon as akin to bad taste. Heavy bands of astrakhan were slashed across the sleeves and fronts of his double-breasted coat, while the deep blue cloak which was thrown over his shoulders was lined with flame-colored silk and secured at the neck with a brooch which consisted of a single flaming beryl. Boots which extended halfway up his calves, and which were trimmed at the tops with rich brown fur, completed the impression of barbaric opulence which was suggested by his whole appearance. He carried a broad-brimmed hat in his hand, while he wore across the upper part of his face, extending down past the cheekbones, a black vizard mask, which he had apparently adjusted that very moment, for his hand was still raised to it as he entered. From the lower part of the face he appeared to be a man of strong character, with a thick, hanging lip, and a long, straight chin suggestive of resolution pushed to the length of obstinacy.

“You had my note?” he asked with a deep harsh voice and a strongly marked German accent. “I told you that I would call.” He looked from one to the other of us, as if uncertain which to address.

“Pray take a seat,” said Holmes. “This is my friend and colleague, Dr. Watson, who is occasionally good enough to help me in my cases. Whom have I the honor to address?”

“You may address me as the Count Von Kramm, a Bohemian nobleman. I understand that this gentleman, your friend, is a man of honor and discretion, whom I may trust with a matter of the most extreme importance. If not, I should much prefer to communicate with you alone.”

I rose to go, but Holmes caught me by the wrist and pushed me back into my chair. “It is both, or none,” said he. “You may say before this gentleman anything which you may say to me.”

The Count shrugged his broad shoulders. “Then I must begin,” said he, “by binding you both to absolute secrecy for two years; at the end of that time the matter will be of no importance. At present it is not too much to say that it is of such weight it may have an influence upon European history.”

“I promise,” said Holmes.

“You will excuse this mask,” continued our strange visitor. “The august person who employs me wishes his agent to be unknown to you, and I may confess at once that the title by which I have just called myself is not exactly my own.”

“I was aware of it,” said Holmes drily.

“The circumstances are of great delicacy, and every precaution has to be taken to quench what might grow to be an immense scandal and seriously compromise one of the reigning families of Europe. To speak plainly, the matter implicates the great House of Ormstein, hereditary kings of Bohemia.”

“I was also aware of that,” murmured Holmes, settling himself down in his armchair and closing his eyes.

Our visitor glanced with some apparent surprise at the languid, lounging figure of the man who had been no doubt depicted to him as the most incisive reasoner and most energetic agent in Europe. Holmes slowly reopened his eyes and looked impatiently at his gigantic client.

“If your Majesty would condescend to state your case,” he remarked, “I should be better able to advise you.”

The man sprang from his chair and paced up and down the room in uncontrollable agitation. Then, with a gesture of desperation, he tore the mask from his face and hurled it upon the ground. “You are right,” he cried; “I am the King. Why should I attempt to conceal it?”

“Why, indeed?” murmured Holmes. “Your Majesty had not spoken before I was aware that I was addressing Wilhelm Gottsreich Sigismond von Ormstein, Grand Duke of Cassel-Felstein, and hereditary King of Bohemia.”

“But you can understand,” said our strange visitor, sitting down once more and passing his hand over his high white forehead, “you can understand that I am not accustomed to doing such business in my own person. Yet the matter was so delicate that I could not confide it to an agent without putting myself in his power. I have come incognito from Prague for the purpose of consulting you.”

“Then, pray consult,” said Holmes, shutting his eyes once more.

“The facts are briefly these: Some five years ago, during a lengthy visit to Warsaw, I made the acquaintance of the wellknown adventuress, Irene Adler. The name is no doubt familiar to you.”

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