See, what I mean

I mean — перевод на русский

Словосочетания

Переведено сервисом «Яндекс.Переводчик»

Перевод по словам

Примеры

У меня нет никаких дурных намерений. / Я не намереваюсь причинить вред. ☰

I meant no harm.

Я не хотел вас обидеть. ☰

Do you dig what I mean?

Ты понимаешь, что я имею в виду? ☰

I meant it facetiously.

Я хотел пошутить. / Я просто шутил. ☰

Let me explain what I mean.

Позвольте мне объяснить, что я имею в виду. ☰

I meant what I said earlier.

Я тогда говорил серьёзно. / Я не шутил, когда это сказал. ☰

They’re rich, but I mean rich.

Они богаты, — то есть, очень богаты. ☰

You know full well what I mean.

Ты прекрасно знаешь, о чём я. ☰

I’m sorry. I meant no disrespect.

Простите, я не хотел проявить неуважение. ☰

You never understand what I mean!

Ты никогда меня не понимаешь! ☰

You know bleeding well what I mean.

Чёрт, ты прекрасно знаешь, что я имею в виду. ☰

‘Do you know what I mean?’ ‘Sort of’.

— Понимаешь, о чём я? — Отчасти. ☰

I meant the pink dress, not the red one.

Я имел в виду розовое платье, а не красное. ☰

I mean profit. That show must be cleaning up.

Я говорю о прибыли. От этого шоу должен быть колоссальный доход. ☰

Don’t mistake me, I mean exactly what I said.

Не искажайте мои слова, я имею в виду именно то, что я сказал. ☰

I meant we’d have to leave early — that’s all.

Я имел в виду, что нам придётся уйти пораньше, и всё. ☰

A single example serves to illustrate what I mean.

Иллюстрацией моих слов служит один-единственный пример. ☰

I mean to carry you off for a crack at the rabbits.

Я хотел позвать тебя пострелять кроликов. ☰

‘Do you understand what I mean?’ ‘Yes, I think so.’

— Вы понимаете, что я имею в виду? — Да, вроде бы понимаю. ☰

He didn’t have the slightest notion of what I meant.

Он совсем не понимал, что я имел в виду. ☰

He’s very ambitious, and I mean that as a compliment.

Он очень честолюбив, и я говорю это, как комплимент. ☰

She’s not getting any thinner, if you know what I mean.

Худее она не становится — если ты понимаешь, о чём я. ☰

It’s nice to have a change sometimes. Know what I mean?

Приятно иногда что-то поменять. Понимаешь, о чём я? ☰

‘That’s not what I mean, and you know it,’ he protested.

— Я не это имею в виду, и тебе это известно, — возразил он. ☰

Yes, I meant you when I complained about people who gossip!

Да, я имел в виду вас, когда жаловался на людей, которые сплетничают! ☰

I meant to buy some milk, but it completely slipped my mind.

Я собирался купить молока, но это совершенно вылетело у меня из головы. ☰

I mean unwanted telephone sales pitches at inconvenient times.

Я про то, когда названивают в неудобное время и склоняют вас что-то купить. ☰

‘Do you understand what I mean?’ ‘Not really. I’m a bit lost.’

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— Вы понимаете, что я имею в виду? — Не очень. Я как-то потерял ход мысли. ☰

I like you. Don’t take this the wrong way, now. I mean as a friend.

Ты мне нравишься. То есть, не подумай чего плохого — ты нравишься мне, как друг. ☰

We do not intend to go out at all in Florence — I mean into society.

Мы не собираемся никуда ходить во Флоренции — я имею в виду бывать в обществе. ☰

Примеры, ожидающие перевода

I don’t mean to seem ungrateful. ☰

His children mean everything to him. ☰

Farming is their means of subsistence. ☰

You don’t mean that seriously, do you? ☰

What exactly did she mean by that anyhow? ☰

That didn’t come out the way I meant it to. ☰

Oh, pardon me, I didn’t mean to disturb you. ☰

Для того чтобы добавить вариант перевода, кликните по иконке ☰ , напротив примера.

TURNS WORDS
INTO PICTURES

A communication tool for people living with dementia

*Update* See What I Mean is no longer active. We continue to advise and mentor organisations and individuals using technology to improve the lives of people living with dementia. If you think you can benefit from our advice get in touch

What is See What i Mean?

See What I Mean (SWiM) is an app which translates words into pictures. The instant translation of word to image brings the idea into a moment of conversation and has been found to be effective at stimulating memories, improving communication, mood and levels of engagement amongst people with dementia.

For people living with dementia words can become increasingly hard to understand, making communication and social interaction difficult. Images, on the other hand, can retain their meaning long after the sense of a word has been lost. This means that for most people living with dementia an image communicates an idea or emotion more clearly than a word.

How does it work?

It’s simple. You say a word and the SWiM app will find an image which corresponds to that word. For example, in a conversation about holidays, a trip to Paris is mentioned. The app brings up a selection of images of Paris, which in turn helps stimulate memory and encourage interaction.

The SWiM app has access to a huge range of images from Google and Getty Images. The app also allows you to save your favourites, so you can build a collection of images which hold particular meaning or interest.

You can also upload your own photos creating a library of meaningful images unique to you or your loved one.

Our Story

See What I Mean was originally created as a speech to image communication tool by Ilyanna Kerr (Co-Founder) in the final year of her Design degree at Goldsmiths University. During the early stages of its development she found the app to have many potential uses through experimentation and testing with a wide range of people. This design process led her to discover it to be a powerful tool in helping to stimulate memory and interaction for people affected by dementia. Since then See What I Mean have continued to work alongside people living with dementia and their friends, family and carers to develop a tool that meets their needs. The SWiM app was used by care providers in the UK to support the care of people living with dementia and provided important insights into the possibilities technology has for people living with cognitive impairments. See What I Mean is currently inactive but we do continue to advise and mentor organisations and individuals using technology to improve the lives of people living with dementia. If you think you could benefit from our advice get in touch.

What are the benefits?

The benefits of using images with people living with dementia have long been recognised, e.g reminiscence therapy. Images help stimulate memory and engagement, which in turn can improve wellbeing and quality of life.

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With the SWiM app the conversation is not limited to the hard copy images you have to hand, and it’s not slowed down by searching for images on the internet. The ease of use and instant translation of word to image encourages a natural flow to conversation. Images can be saved, creating a familiar and meaningful collection. This ability to refer back to these images can play an important role in supporting a person with dementia as their condition progresses.

Our Impact

In 2020 we tested the effects SWiM could have on communication, engagement and mood on people living with dementia at a dementia care centre. It produced some remarkable results:

In 90% of sessions the app improved communication between participants and facilitators

In 90% of sessions the app improved communication between participants and facilitators

In 70% of sessions the app led to a significant improvement in mood of the participants

In 70% of sessions the app led to a significant improvement in mood of the participants

100% of care staff who used the app would use it on a regular basis and recommend it to friends and colleagues

In 90% of sessions the app improved communication between participants and facilitators

In 90% of sessions the app improved communication between participants and facilitators

In 70% of sessions the app led to a significant improvement in mood of the participants

In 70% of sessions the app led to a significant improvement in mood of the participants

100% of care staff who used the app would use it on a regular basis and recommend it to friends and colleagues

The app clearly encouraged participant engagement and in 87% of sessions significantly increased the level of participant engagement

100% of care staff who used the app would use it on a regular basis and recommend it to friends and colleagues

What is the difference between “I see you”, “what you mean”, and “I am seeing what you mean”?

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Answer Wiki

The following phrases all mean, “I understand what you are telling me.”

  • I see. (not “I see you.”)
  • I see what you mean.
  • I get what you mean.
  • I get you.
  • I get it.
  • Got it.

Each of these sound natural to native speakers of American English .

“I see you” means that your eyes see the person you are talking to. Ann Clark gave a good example of this in her answer to this question.

“I see you” can also be an expression used in the card game of Poker . It means, in that case, “I will bet (gamble) the same amount of money that you just bet, so I will stay in the game.”

“What you mean” is the part of the phrase th.

See What I Mean

The first of four parts of this full length documentary.

The second of four parts of this full length documentary.

The third of four parts of this full length documentary.

The fourth of four parts of this full length documentary.

Credits from this documentary.

Loading Docs 2020 — Hear Me Out

Short documentary about NZ’s first deaf MP

A Deaf Child in the Family

Another documentary on deafness

Closer

A short film featuring a deaf teenage boy

Strangers — Episode One

Kidult drama featuring a deaf character

Early Days Yet

Also directed by Shirley Horrocks

The Silent One

Feature film about a deaf boy

Marti: The Passionate Eye

Also directed by Shirley Horrocks

This is Your Life — Lance Cairns

Lance Cairns is deaf

Kiwiana

Also directed by Shirley Horrocks

The New Oceania

Also directed by Shirley Horrocks

See What I Mean is a documentary about people with a hearing impairment, and those who identify as deaf. It tells the stories of a family who were all born deaf, and a journalist who began to lose her hearing in her twenties. It features footage of deaf community events including rugby, an education meeting and socialising at the Deaf Club. This was the documentary that first presented the idea of ‘Deaf Culture’ on New Zealand television, relating it to protest activities by the American deaf community. The film was directed by Shirley Horrocks (Kiwiana, The New Oceania).

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Key Cast & Crew

Shirley Horrocks

Director, Producer, Writer

Miranda Harcourt

Roger Horrocks

Produced by

Source

Availability

Acknowledgements

Made with funding from NZ On Air

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Do “You see me?” and “You get me?” mean “Do you understand what I mean?”

Sometimes after finish explaining something, people will say, «You see me?» or «You get me?»

I wonder if they are equivalent to «Do you understand what I mean?»

3 Answers 3

«You get me?» most certainly means «do you understand me?» «You see me» is unfamiliar to me (US EN), perhaps they mean «Do you see what I mean?»

In any event the context you provided (question asked after an explanation) makes it almost certain that the latter question, like the other, is used to mean «Do you understand?»

Rather than being used to mean «Do you understand?», in ordinary American speech the phrase «You get me?» is used as near-meaningless filler; that is, like «You know» it is a discourse particle. («In linguistics, a discourse particle is a lexeme or particle which has no direct semantic meaning in the context of a sentence, having rather a pragmatic function: it serves to indicate the speaker’s attitude, or to structure their relationship to other participants in a conversation.»)

I don’t recall hearing or reading «You see me» with any relation to «Do you understand?». I have heard it said (or have said it) in sentences like «You see me on the left in this picture.» Of course if I heard a person say «You see me?» several times in a conversation, I would class it as a discourse particle in that person’s vocabulary.

Yes. Both phrases mean that. Another way of use is simply stating them, instead of questioned. ex. «you get me» . just like an affirmation of the fact that «you understand me», «you feel who I am», «you see what I’m about», «you see ME». Used this way, both phrases «you get me» and «you see me» acquire a bit more of a sensory-like meaning; perhaps more like a recognition of emotional understanding and synchronism rather than just the comprehension of what’s verbally expressed.

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