Ruffus The Dog – Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde

Содержание

R. Stevenson. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (read and listen online in the original)

Книга на английском языке «The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde» не является адаптированной, однако читать такие книги очень полезно. На первый взгляд это может показаться сложным, но на самом деле надо просто научиться игнорировать незнакомые слова, которые, как правило, относятся к литературному стилю и придают произведению образность и своеобразие. Однако с точки зрения расширения вашего словарного запаса, а также понимания эти слова не являются существенными.

Из цикла «Книги на английском языке в оригинале с аудио»

Итак, начинаем читать и слушать известнейшее произведение Роберта Стивенсона «The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde» на английском языке в оригинале.

Robert Louis Stevenson «The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde» (in English, in the original)

Chapter One. Story of the Door

Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theater, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. «I incline to Cain’s heresy,» he used to say quaintly: «I let my brother go to the devil in his own way.» In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of downgoing men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour.

No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer’s way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted.

It chanced on one of these rambles that their way led them down a by-street in a busy quarter of London. The street was small and what is called quiet, but it drove a thriving trade on the weekdays. The inhabitants were all doing well, it seemed and all emulously hoping to do better still, and laying out the surplus of their grains in coquetry; so that the shop fronts stood along that thoroughfare with an air of invitation, like rows of smiling saleswomen. Even on Sunday, when it veiled its more florid charms and lay comparatively empty of passage, the street shone out in contrast to its dingy neighbourhood, like a fire in a forest; and with its freshly painted shutters, well-polished brasses, and general cleanliness and gaiety of note, instantly caught and pleased the eye of the passenger.

Two doors from one corner, on the left hand going east the line was broken by the entry of a court; and just at that point a certain sinister block of building thrust forward its gable on the street. It was two storeys high; showed no window, nothing but a door on the lower storey and a blind forehead of discoloured wall on the upper; and bore in every feature, the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence. The door, which was equipped with neither bell nor knocker, was blistered and distained. Tramps slouched into the recess and struck matches on the panels; children kept shop upon the steps; the schoolboy had tried his knife on the mouldings; and for close on a generation, no one had appeared to drive away these random visitors or to repair their ravages.

Mr. Enfield and the lawyer were on the other side of the by-street; but when they came abreast of the entry, the former lifted up his cane and pointed.
«Did you ever remark that door?» he asked; and when his companion had replied in the affirmative. «It is connected in my mind,» added he, «with a very odd story.»
«Indeed?» said Mr. Utterson, with a slight change of voice, «and what was that?»

«Well, it was this way,» returned Mr. Enfield: «I was coming home from some place at the end of the world, about three o’clock of a black winter morning, and my way lay through a part of town where there was literally nothing to be seen but lamps. Street after street and all the folks asleep-street after street, all lighted up as if for a procession and all as empty as a churchtill at last I got into that state of mind when a man listens and listens and begins to long for the sight of a policeman. All at once, I saw two figures: one a little man who was stumping along eastward at a good walk, and the other a girl of maybe eight or ten who was running as hard as she was able down a cross street. Well, sir, the two ran into one another naturally enough at the corner; and then came the horrible part of the thing; for the man trampled calmly over the child’s body and left her screaming on the ground. It sounds nothing to hear, but it was hellish to see. It wasn’t like a man; it was like some damned Juggernaut. I gave a few halloa, took to my heels, collared my gentleman, and brought him back to where there was already quite a group about the screaming child. He was perfectly cool and made no resistance, but gave me one look, so ugly that it brought out the sweat on me like running. The people who had turned out were the girl’s own family; and pretty soon, the doctor, for whom she had been sent put in his appearance. Well, the child was not much the worse, more frightened, according to the Sawbones; and there you might have supposed would be an end to it. But there was one curious circumstance. I had taken a loathing to my gentleman at first sight. So had the child’s family, which was only natural. But the doctor’s case was what struck me. He was the usual cut and dry apothecary, of no particular age and colour, with a strong Edinburgh accent and about as emotional as a bagpipe. Well, sir, he was like the rest of us; every time he looked at my prisoner, I saw that Sawbones turn sick and white with desire to kill him. I knew what was in his mind, just as he knew what was in mine; and killing being out of the question, we did the next best. We told the man we could and would make such a scandal out of this as should make his name stink from one end of London to the other. If he had any friends or any credit, we undertook that he should lose them. And all the time, as we were pitching it in red hot, we were keeping the women off him as best we could for they were as wild as harpies. I never saw a circle of such hateful faces; and there was the man in the middle, with a kind of black sneering coolness-frightened to, I could see that-but carrying it off, sir, really like Satan. `If you choose to make capital out of this accident,’ said he, `I am naturally helpless. No gentleman but wishes to avoid a scene,’ says he. `Name your figure.’ Well, we screwed him up to a hundred pounds for the child’s family; he would have clearly liked to stick out; but there was something about the lot of us that meant mischief, and at last he struck. The next thing was to get the money; and where do you think he carried us but to that place with the door?-whipped out a key, went in, and presently came back with the matter of ten pounds in gold and a cheque for the balance on Coutts’s, drawn payable to bearer and signed with a name that I can’t mention, though it’s one of the points of my story, but it was a name at least very well known and often printed. The figure was stiff; but the signature was good for more than that if it was only genuine. I took the liberty of pointing out to my gentleman that the whole business looked apocryphal, and that a man does not, in real life, walk into a cellar door at four in the morning and come out with another man’s cheque for close upon a hundred pounds. But he was quite easy and sneering. `Set your mind at rest,’ says he, `I will stay with you till the banks open and cash the cheque myself.’ So we all set of, the doctor, and the child’s father, and our friend and myself, and passed the rest of the night in my chambers; and next day, when we had breakfasted, went in a body to the bank. I gave in the cheque myself, and said I had every reason to believe it was a forgery. Not a bit of it. The cheque was genuine.»

«Tut-tut,» said Mr. Utterson.
«I see you feel as I do,» said Mr. Enfield. «Yes, it’s a bad story. For my man was a fellow that nobody could have to do with, a really damnable man; and the person that drew the cheque is the very pink of the proprieties, celebrated too, and (what makes it worse) one of your fellows who do what they call good. Black mail I suppose; an honest man paying through the nose for some of the capers of his youth. Black Mail House is what I call the place with the door, in consequence. Though even that, you know, is far from explaining all,» he added, and with the words fell into a vein of musing.

From this he was recalled by Mr. Utterson asking rather suddenly: «And you don’t know if the drawer of the cheque lives there?»
«A likely place, isn’t it?» returned Mr. Enfield. «But I happen to have noticed his address; he lives in some square or other.»
«And you never asked about the-place with the door?» said Mr. Utterson.
«No, sir: I had a delicacy,» was the reply. «I feel very strongly about putting questions; it partakes too much of the style of the day of judgment. You start a question, and it’s like starting a stone. You sit quietly on the top of a hill; and away the stone goes, starting others; and presently some bland old bird (the last you would have thought of) is knocked on the head in his own back garden and the family have to change their name. No sir, I make it a rule of mine: the more it looks like Queer Street, the less I ask.»
«A very good rule, too,» said the lawyer.

В школе этого не расскажут:  Курсы турецкого языка Turkish First в Москве

«But I have studied the place for myself,» continued Mr. Enfield. «It seems scarcely a house. There is no other door, and nobody goes in or out of that one but, once in a great while, the gentleman of my adventure. There are three windows looking on the court on the first floor; none below; the windows are always shut but they’re clean. And then there is a chimney which is generally smoking; so somebody must live there. And yet it’s not so sure; for the buildings are so packed together about the court, that it’s hard to say where one ends and another begins.»

The pair walked on again for a while in silence; and then «Enfield,» said Mr. Utterson, «that’s a good rule of yours.»
«Yes, I think it is,» returned Enfield.
«But for all that,» continued the lawyer, «there’s one point I want to ask: I want to ask the name of that man who walked over the child.»
«Well,» said Mr. Enfield, «I can’t see what harm it would do. It was a man of the name of Hyde.»
«Hm,» said Mr. Utterson. «What sort of a man is he to see?»

«He is not easy to describe. There is something wrong with his appearance; something displeasing, something down-right detestable. I never saw a man I so disliked, and yet I scarce know why. He must be deformed somewhere; he gives a strong feeling of deformity, although I couldn’t specify the point. He’s an extraordinary looking man, and yet I really can name nothing out of the way. No, sir; I can make no hand of it; I can’t describe him. And it’s not want of memory; for I declare I can see him this moment.»

Mr. Utterson again walked some way in silence and obviously under a weight of consideration. «You are sure he used a key?» he inquired at last.
«My dear sir …» began Enfield, surprised out of himself.
«Yes, I know,» said Utterson; «I know it must seem strange. The fact is, if I do not ask you the name of the other party, it is because I know it already. You see, Richard, your tale has gone home. If you have been inexact in any point you had better correct it.»
«I think you might have warned me,» returned the other with a touch of sullenness. «But I have been pedantically exact, as you call it. The fellow had a key; and what’s more, he has it still. I saw him use it not a week ago.»

Mr. Utterson sighed deeply but said never a word; and the young man presently resumed. «Here is another lesson to say nothing,» said he. «I am ashamed of my long tongue. Let us make a bargain never to refer to this again.»
«With all my heart,» said the lawyer. I shake hands on that, Richard

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Ruffus the Dog

Robert Mills / Hunky Dorey Entertainment

Fairytale adventures have gone to the dogs!

In this hilarious animal puppet series, Ruffus discovers his dark side as he portrays both the kind-hearted Dr. Ruffus and the nefarious Mr. Snide from the classic Robert Louis Stevenson tale: The Strange Case Of Doctor Jekyll And Mister Hyde. Features the song: “Tonight!”. Click on the next video for more fun tales!

Watching: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

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Robin Hood

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Rapunzel

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Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

In this hilarious animal puppet series, Ruffus discovers his dark side as he portrays both the kind-hearted Dr. Ruffus and the nefarious Mr. Snide from the classic Robert Louis Stevenson tale: The Strange Case Of Doctor Jekyll And Mister Hyde. Features the song: “Tonight!”. Click on the next video for more fun tales!

The Frog Prince

Ruffus plays the part of an enchanted Prince who has been transformed into a frog and the only way to break the spell is to become best friends with a beautiful Princess. Features the song: “Promises”.

The Brave Little Tailor

As The Brave Little Tailor poor Ruffus gets “elected” to defend his small town from a rampaging Giant – a big green guy who likes to throw houses around and complain about his inseam. Features the wonderfully silly song: “Pants”. Watch other fun remakes of classic tales from this hilarious puppet show for kids!

Around the World in 80 Days

In this hilarious animal puppet series, the whole world is the star as Ruffus and his friends tackle this great Jules Verne classic – to win a bet they must travel “Around The World In 80 Days”. Features the great song: “Ol’ Blue Soul”. Click on the next video for more fun tales!

Three Little Pigs

In this episode of the hilarious puppet show for kids, Ruffus takes on the role of The Big Bad Wolf – with a big case of bad breath – who does his best to get the chin hairs of “The Three Little Pigs”. Watch other classic tales from this hilarious puppet show for kids!

Little Red Riding Hood

In this animal puppet series, Ruffus gets to play a little girl who must make her way through the forest to visit her grandmother – but the Big Bad Wolf has other plans. Features the song: “Trouble”. Watch other fun remakes of classic tales from this hilarious puppet show for kids!

Little Bo Peep

In this hilarous animal puppet series, Ruffus finds himself in a dress – once again – as he does his best to keep charge of the rambunctious and pesky sheep. Mayhem ensues. Features the song: “Please Stay”. Click on the next video for more fun tales!

Sinbad the Sailor

In this funny re-make of the classic tale, Ruffus – along with his pals – Ray and Harry, the Hausen brothers – sets out on a quest for adventure across the seven seas. Watch out for the Cyclops! Features the song: “Seven Seas”. Enjoy more fun videos from this hilarious dog!

Aladdin and the Magic Lamp

In this re-telling of the tale of Aladdin, Ruffus gets his chance to make three wishes from a Genie in a magic lamp – but be careful what you wish for. Features the song: “Dreamer’s Song”

Tom Thumb

In this award-winning episode, Ruffus plays the diminutive Tom Thumb who, with his friend Bliss the pig, embarks on quest to find his place in the big world beyond his doorstep. Features the song: “Ode To The Road”. Click on the next video for more fun tales!

Robinson Crusoe

In this episode of the hilarious puppet show for kids, Ruffus gets stranded on a deserted island and must fend for himself far from civilization – but our hero learns the civilized world isn’t all it’s cracked up to be and paradise can always be found in the company of friends. Features the song: “Send It To Paradise”

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

In this episode of the hilarious puppet show for kids, Ruffus takes a page from Jules Verne and goes for an undersea voyage with the infamous Captain Nemo and his crew on The Nautilus, a remarkable steam-punk submarine – and they encounter a giant squid! Features the song: “Claustrophobia”. Click on the next video to see what happens next!

The Three Bears

In this hilarious animal puppet series, Ruffus is one hep cat as he and his two beat poet pig pals take on the story of The Three Bears. The entire show is set to a jazzy snare beat. Click on the next video for more fun tales!

The Emperor’s New Clothes

In this notorious version of “The Emperor’s New Clothes”, Ruffus plays a dishonest tailor who takes advantage of a less-than-wise Emperor, preying upon his ego and vanity, to sell him something less than he had before – and more than his loyal subjects had bargained for. Features the song: “Emperor’s New Clothes”. Enjoy more fun videos from this hilarious dog!

The Three Musketeers

In this episode of the hilarious puppet show for kids, Ruffus plays D’Artagnan in the Alexandre Dumas classic “The Three Musketeers”. It’s one for all and all for one as they try to save King Louis. Features the song: “One For All”.

The Troll Under the Bridge

In this hilarious animal puppet series, Ruffus plays a young baker. He, and the rest of the folks in his town, learn a lesson about the homeless in this re-telling of “The Troll Under The Bridge”. Features the song: “A Misfit’s Chance To Change”. Click on the next video for more fun tales!

The Pied Piper

In this eerie tale the Pied Piper, played by Ruffus, keeps his promise to rid the town of Hamlin of every last rat. Watch other fun videos from this great show for kids!

The Second Voyage of Sinbad

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Rip Van Winkle

In this hilarious animal puppet series, Ruffus gets to plays the title character, Rip Van Winkle, who falls asleep in the woods and ends up bowling with the elves – helping them make the crashing sounds of thunder. Lots of silly fun and some great bowling action scenes! Features the lovely lullabye: “A Day Be Done”. Click on the next video for more fun tales!

Gulliver’s Travels

Ruffus, in the Jonathan Swift classic Gulliver’s Travels, visits the tiny island of Lilliput where he meets the even tinier people who live there! Gulliver proves himself to be a big friend of the Lilliputians and even falls in love with the teensy weensy little Princess. Features the song: Mini-Minuet. Don’t miss our other fun dog adventures in this hilarious animal puppet series!

Hansel & Gretel

Ruffus plays himself (and his sister!) in this classic fairytale of two children lost in the woods who discover a cottage made of candies and sweets. But the wicked old woman who owns the cottage has other plans. Features the song: “Let Them Eat Cake”. Don’t miss our other fun dog adventures in this hilarious animal puppet series!

King Midas

In this hilarious animal puppet series, Ruffus plays the greedy King Midas who wishes everything he touches could turn to gold. When his deepest desire is granted, King Midas finds out the hard way that sometimes you must be careful what you wish for. Features the song: Ballad Of King Midas. Click on the next video for more fun tales!

Cinderella

Ruffus gets to play the title role in Cinderella and learns, with the help of a very special Fairy Governator, that beauty is indeed in the eye of the beholder. Features the song: “I Pine”. Don’t miss our other fun dog adventures in this hilarious animal puppet series!

A Christmas Carol

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Don’t you trust me? by ChopinWorshipper for moon_hedgehog

Fandoms: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Creator Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings
  • No Archive Warnings Apply
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Edward Hyde
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Health Check
  • Modern AU
  • female hyde
Summary

Edwina is not comfortable with health checks.

You’ve been drinking tonight, haven’t you? by ChopinWorshipper for moon_hedgehog

Fandoms: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Creator Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings
  • No Archive Warnings Apply
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Edward Hyde
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Alcohol Abuse/Alcoholism
  • Hyde tried to forget all the crap he’s gone through
  • jekyll cares
  • Angst and Hurt/Comfort
Summary

Hyde attempts to drown his traumata of the past months in alcohol. Jekyll cares and is worried.

What happened back there? by ChopinWorshipper for moon_hedgehog

Fandoms: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Creator Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings
  • No Archive Warnings Apply
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Henry Jekyll/Gabriel John Utterson
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll/Gabriel John Utterson
  • Edward Hyde
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Modern AU
  • female hyde
  • edwina ain’t taking no shit
В школе этого не расскажут:  The Present Perfect. Time expressions (указатели времени)
Summary

Edwina takes offense at people offending her or her boyfriends, but Henry assures her.

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde rewritten by ChopinWorshipper

Fandoms: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Graphic Depictions Of Violence
  • Rape/Non-Con
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Gabriel John Utterson/Original Character(s)/Henry Jekyll (platonic)
  • Henry Jekyll/Gabriel John Utterson/Edward Hyde
  • Edward Hyde/Gabriel John Utterson
  • Henry Jekyll/Gabriel John Utterson
  • Edward Hyde/Original Character(s)/Henry Jekyll (platonic)
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll & Dr. Hastie Lanyon
  • Gabriel John Utterson & Dr. Hastie Lanyon
  • Edward Hyde & Henry Jekyll
  • Dr. Hastie Lanyon/Original Character(s)
  • Edward Hyde
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Gabriel John Utterson
  • Dr. Hastie Lanyon
  • Danvers Carew
  • Poole
  • Original Female Character(s)
  • Original Male Character(s)
  • this is a slight AU
  • still the same universe
  • but none of the book characters dies
  • there will still be deaths though
  • there is also telepathy
  • and telepaths
  • because why not
  • also evil scientist organisations
  • Torture
  • Major Character Injury
  • and a lot of violence because Hyde
  • Angst with a Happy Ending
  • Denial of Feelings
  • Internalized Homophobia
  • and female mary sue ocs
  • because there totally aren’t enough of those
  • yes i’m one of those writers
Summary

What if Hyde hadn’t succeeded in killing Sir Carew? What if there was a conveniently badass female telepath present to save the night? What said telepath could actually force Jekyll to be honest for once? What if Lanyon recovered from his shock? What if someone actually listened to Hyde’s version of the story?
I asked myself these and a lot of other questions, so I wrote this story. Warning: here there be angst and drama. LOTS AND LOTS OF DRAMA. And gay pairings. Don’t like, don’t read. Easy as pie.
Also, some of the chapters or passages are shamelessly copied/rewritten from the book. I’m sorry. I would never dare to claim to remotely compare to Robert Louis Stevenson’s writing.

Poison And Wine by thatsmyhyde

Fandoms: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Creator Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Edward Hyde
Summary

Chronological scenes of an unfolding tragedy — dangerously self-obsessed Dr. Henry Jekyll and his little counterpart Edward Hyde navigate their shared life together and can’t keep their hands off of each other. It doesn’t end well, but we all knew that already.

I won’t lose you too by ChopinWorshipper for moon_hedgehog

Fandoms: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Major Character Death
  • Henry Jekyll/Gabriel John Utterson (implied)
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Edward Hyde/Gabriel John Utterson (platonic)
  • Gabriel John Utterson
  • Edward Hyde
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll (referenced)
  • Danvers Carew (referenced)
  • Original Female Character (referenced)
  • in which things are the same as in the book
  • but utterson manages to save hyde
  • they stay at lady summers’ country home temporarily
  • Everyone is unhappy
  • and homesick
  • jekyll is greatly missed
  • Heartbreak
  • Angst and Hurt/Comfort
Summary

Utterson and Hyde are staying at Lady Summers’ country home in Cornwall, until it’s safe for them to leave England, as Hyde is a wanted man. But Hyde is unhappy in this isolated Manor and one night Utterson catches him trying to run away.

Dance with me by ChopinWorshipper for moon_hedgehog

Fandoms: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Creator Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings
  • No Archive Warnings Apply
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Edward Hyde
  • Original Female Character(s)
  • Modern AU
  • female hyde
  • piano lessons
  • Dancing Lessons
Summary

Henry ruins a piano lesson, so he can teach Edwina how to dance.

Nothing is wrong with you by ChopinWorshipper for moon_hedgehog

Fandoms: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson

  • Creator Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Edward Hyde
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • jekyll gets drunk and self destructive
  • hyde goes into emotional support mode
  • in his own gremlin way
  • Alcohol Abuse/Alcoholism
  • Self-Harm
  • Self-Hatred
  • Self-Esteem Issues
Summary

Jekyll is a wreck and Hyde provides emotional support.

Handfull by Wilsonthenonbinarydisaster

Fandoms: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Creator Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings
  • Henry Jekyll/Gabriel John Utterson
  • Edward Hyde/Gabriel John Utterson
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Edward Hyde
  • Gabriel John Utterson
  • Fluff
  • Cuddles
  • henry is needy
  • jekyll even more so
  • Morning Cuddles
  • utterson is daddy
Summary

The two men where a handful. Good thing Utterson can carry them both

Acc >Fandoms: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson, Jekyll & Hyde — Wildhorn

  • No Archive Warnings Apply
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Edward Hyde/Gabriel John Utterson
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll/Gabriel John Utterson
  • Lucy Harris/Edward Hyde (kinda)
  • Lucy Harris/Original Female Character
  • Dr. Hastie Lanyon/Original female character
  • Edward Hyde
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Lucy Harris
  • Gabriel John Utterson
  • Dr. Hastie Lanyon
  • Original Female Character(s)
  • Unplanned Pregnancy
  • Love/Hate
  • Unresolved Emotional Tension
  • hyde knocks lucy up
  • no one is happy about it
  • especially not the future parents
  • the others have none of that ‘running from the consequences’-crap
  • lucy finds about about hyde’s secret
  • eventual queerplatonic lucy/hyde
  • Queerplatonic Relationships
Summary

Hyde is faced with the fact that sleeping with a woman repeatedly can have *gasp* long-term consequences!

Oh No, Emotions! by ChopinWorshipper

Fandoms: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Rape/Non-Con
  • Underage
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Henry Jekyll/Gabriel John Utterson
  • Edward Hyde/Gabriel John Utterson
  • Dr. Hastie Lanyon/OC
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Edward Hyde
  • Gabriel John Utterson
  • Dr. Hastie Lanyon
  • Original Female Character(s)
  • Original Male Character(s)
  • Here there be angst
  • and lots of drama
  • dark themes in some chapters
  • hyde is a girl
  • genderbender
  • Polyamory
Summary

Okay, so the essential plot to my modern AU story is this:
Our favourite gremlin is a girl named Edwina Hyde (yes, I failed to be more creative, I’m not sorry). She’s a twenty-year-old delinquent, who’s just been released on parole. Mr. Utterson offers her a place to stay, she agrees and becomes a fellow lodger of him, Jekyll and Lanyon in Lady Summer’s grand home. A very cliché love triangle between her, Utterson and Jekyll ensues and there is polyamory.
This story will be corny and dramatic and I am not sorry XD

Kópakonan by ChopinWorshipper for moon_hedgehog

Fandoms: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Major Character Death
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Hastie Lanyon
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll/Dr. Hastie Lanyon
  • Edward Hyde
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Dr. Hastie Lanyon
  • lanyonxhyde
  • one-s >

Henry had always loved the old Selkie legends, but he had never believed in them. Until now.

Inconveniently a merma >Fandoms: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson

  • No Archive Warnings Apply
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Henry Jekyll/Gabriel John Utterson
  • Edward Hyde/Gabriel John Utterson
  • Edward Hyde
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Gabriel John Utterson
  • Dr. Hastie Lanyon
  • Original Female Character(s)
  • Poole
  • Original Male Character(s)
  • hyde is suddenly a merma >

Utterson didn’t know what he was looking at, but he didn’t like it.

of all the things, the most by moon_hedgehog

Fandoms: The Glass Scientists (Webcomic), The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Rape/Non-Con
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • a bunch of dark aus
  • Non-Explicit Sex
  • Abusive Relationships
  • all trigger warnings in the notes
  • smth for Halloween
Summary

it is a monstrous love and it makes monsters of us all.

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde/Tam Lin crossover or How To Steal A Fae’s Boyfriend by ChopinWorshipper

Fandoms: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson, Tam Lin (Traditional Ballad)
  • No Archive Warnings Apply
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll/Gabriel John Utterson
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Edward Hyde
  • Gabriel John Utterson
  • The Queen (Tam Lin)
  • Original Female Character(s)
  • Jekyll and Hyde/fairy tale crossover
  • Sorry Not Sorry
  • Trans Character
  • Gabriel is a trans guy
  • I probably d >

It’s Tam Lin, but gay and with the J&H characters, minus Lanyon and plus Lady Summers.

Such A Fine Line by itsvirgil

Fandoms: The Glass Scientists (Webcomic)
  • Graphic Depictions Of Violence
  • Major Character Death
  • Rape/Non-Con
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Jasper Kaylock/Rachel P >

Henry’s been acting very oddly lately. Edward doesn’t know why, but, bloody hell, he was going to make an attempt to find out.

no kingdom to come by moon_hedgehog for Pixel_Vast

Fandoms: The Glass Scientists (Webcomic)
  • No Archive Warnings Apply
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Edward Hyde
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • this is so draft-y..
  • but i owe it to pixel so like
  • Fantasy setting
  • Fairy Tale Elements
  • Mildly Dubious Consent
  • it’s all fine tho
  • there’s some magic sex
  • Loss of Virginity
Summary

of small prices to pay, wrong kings, taxes and the beginning of something new.

light a fire in my heart by moon_hedgehog

Fandoms: The Glass Scientists (Webcomic)
  • No Archive Warnings Apply
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • summary says it all tbh
  • Making Out
  • squint hard enough and you’ll realize it is probably. fast & furious au or smth
Summary

sometimes people need to make out on their sports car hoods.

Shadow Games by skazka

Fandoms: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson

  • Creator Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Edward Hyde
  • Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Hand Jobs
  • Edging
  • >

An unpublished footnote in the history of Henry Jekyll.

love affairs by moon_hedgehog

Fandoms: The Glass Scientists (Webcomic), The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson
  • No Archive Warnings Apply
  • Edward Hyde/Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Shameless Smut
  • these are some old drabbles
  • Morning Sex
  • Light BDSM
  • Light Dom/sub
  • All fluff no pain
  • yay
Summary

two times when Edward Hyde was a top and one time when, well, he wasn’t.

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, novella by Scottish writer Robert Louis Stevenson, published in 1886. The names of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the two alter egos of the main character, have become shorthand for the exhibition of wildly contradictory behaviour, especially between private and public selves.

Summary

The tale—told largely from the perspective of Mr. Gabriel John Utterson, a London lawyer and friend of Dr. Henry Jekyll—begins quietly, with an urbane conversation between Utterson and his friend Mr. Richard Enfield. The latter tells how, returning home in the early hours of the morning, he witnessed a “horrible” incident: a small girl, running across the street, was trampled by a man named Mr. Edward Hyde, who left her screaming on the ground. After being caught, Hyde, who has a face that inspires loathing, agreed to pay the child’s family, and he retrieved from a dilapidated building a check from the account of a respected man. Enfield assumes that Hyde is blackmailing that man, whom Utterson knows to be his client Jekyll.

Utterson has in his files a will in which Jekyll bequeaths everything to Hyde. Troubled, the lawyer visits Dr. Hastie Lanyon, a longtime friend of both Jekyll and Utterson. Lanyon says that he has seen little of Jekyll for more than 10 years, since Jekyll had gotten involved with “unscientific balderdash,” and that he does not know Hyde. Utterson waylays Hyde at the old building and introduces himself and then goes around to Jekyll’s house (the neglected building is a laboratory belonging to the house), only to learn from the butler, Poole, that Jekyll is not at home and that his servants have orders to obey Hyde.

Almost a year later a maid witnesses Hyde beating to death a prominent gentleman who is also a client of Utterson’s. Utterson leads the police to Hyde’s home. Though he is absent, evidence of his guilt is clear. Utterson goes to see if Jekyll is harbouring Hyde, and Jekyll gives Utterson a letter from Hyde, in which Hyde declares that he will be able to escape. However, Utterson’s clerk notices that Jekyll and Hyde appear to have the same handwriting. Jekyll seems healthier and happier over the next few months but later starts refusing visitors. Utterson visits a dying Lanyon, who gives Utterson a document to be opened only after Jekyll’s death or disappearance. Weeks later, Poole requests that Utterson come to Jekyll’s home, as he is fearful that Hyde has murdered Jekyll. When Poole and Utterson break into the laboratory office, they find Hyde’s body on the floor and three documents for Utterson from Jekyll.

Lanyon’s and Jekyll’s documents reveal that Jekyll had secretly developed a potion to allow him to separate the good and evil aspects of his personality. He was thereby able at will to change into his increasingly dominant evil counterpart, Mr. Hyde. While the respectable doctor initially had no difficulty in returning from his rabid personality, he soon found himself slipping into Mr. Hyde without recourse to his drug. He temporarily stopped using his potion, but, when he tried it again, Mr. Hyde committed murder. After that, it took a vast amount of potion to keep him from spontaneously becoming Mr. Hyde. Unable to make any more of the drug because of an unknown but apparently crucial impurity in the original supply, Jekyll soon ran out of the drug. Indeed, he took the last of it to write a confession before becoming Hyde permanently.

Legacy and adaptations

The notion of the “double” was widely popular in the 19th century, especially in German literary discussions of the doppelgänger. Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s The Double (1846) dealt with this very subject, and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s classic Frankenstein tale (1818) can be read in this light. The theme was explored explicitly by Oscar Wilde in The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891) and by H.G. Wells in both The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896) and The Invisible Man (1897). In The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Stevenson suggested that the human propensities for good and evil are not necessarily present in equal measure. Hyde is quite a bit smaller than Jekyll, perhaps indicating that evil is only a small portion of Jekyll’s total personality but one that may express itself in forceful, violent ways. The story has long been interpreted as a representation of the Victorians’ bifurcated self. Jekyll is in every way a gentleman, but just beneath the surface lie baser desires that remain unspoken; he is the very personification of the dichotomy between outward gentility and inward lust. Stevenson’s tale took on new resonance two years after publication with the grisly murders perpetrated by Jack the Ripper in 1888, when the psychological phenomenon that Stevenson explored was invoked to explain a new and specifically urban form of sexual savagery.

В школе этого не расскажут:  Эмфатические согласные арабского языка. Буквы ط - [т̣], ض - [д̣]. Глагол رأى (видеть)

An adaptation of the tale for the stage was first performed in 1887, with Richard Mansfield as Jekyll and Hyde, and several popular films highlighted the novella’s horrific aspects, from a 1920 version starring John Barrymore to a 1971 B-movie, Doctor Jekyll and Sister Hyde, featuring a female alter ego. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931), starring Fredric March, and a later adaptation starring Spencer Tracy (1941) were also notable. Stevenson’s story continued to inspire adaptations into the 21st century. It also spurred debate over whether its main character exhibits dissociative identity disorder, a form of psychosis, or some other psychopathology.

Ruffus The Dog – Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde

THE STRANGE CASE OF DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE

by Robert Louis Stevenson

STORY OF THE DOOR

Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance that was neverlighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backwardin sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary and yet somehow lovable.At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, somethingeminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which neverfound its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silentsymbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the actsof his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone,to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, hadnot crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approvedtolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the highpressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremityinclined to help rather than to reprove. «I incline to Cain’s heresy,»he used to say quaintly: «I let my brother go to the devil in his ownway.» In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the lastreputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives ofdowngoing men. And to such as these, so long as they came about hischambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour.

No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrativeat the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similarcatholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept hisfriendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that wasthe lawyer’s way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whomhe had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth oftime, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt thebond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, thewell-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what thesetwo could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common.It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks,that they said nothing, looked singularly dull and would hail withobvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men putthe greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewelof each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, buteven resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy themuninterrupted.

It chanced on one of these rambles that their way led them down aby-street in a busy quarter of London. The street was small and whatis called quiet, but it drove a thriving trade on the weekdays. Theinhabitants were all doing well, it seemed and all emulously hoping todo better still, and laying out the surplus of their grains in coquetry;so that the shop fronts stood along that thoroughfare with an air ofinvitation, like rows of smiling saleswomen. Even on Sunday, when itveiled its more florid charms and lay comparatively empty of passage,the street shone out in contrast to its dingy neighbourhood, like afire in a forest; and with its freshly painted shutters, well-polishedbrasses, and general cleanliness and gaiety of note, instantly caughtand pleased the eye of the passenger.

Two doors from one corner, on the left hand going east the line wasbroken by the entry of a court; and just at that point a certainsinister block of building thrust forward its gable on the street. Itwas two storeys high; showed no window, nothing but a door on the lowerstorey and a blind forehead of discoloured wall on the upper; and borein every feature, the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence. Thedoor, which was equipped with neither bell nor knocker, was blisteredand distained. Tramps slouched into the recess and struck matches on thepanels; children kept shop upon the steps; the schoolboy had triedhis knife on the mouldings; and for close on a generation, no one hadappeared to drive away these random visitors or to repair their ravages.

Mr. Enfield and the lawyer were on the other side of the by-street; butwhen they came abreast of the entry, the former lifted up his cane andpointed.

«Did you ever remark that door?» he asked; and when his companion hadreplied in the affirmative. «It is connected in my mind,» added he,»with a very odd story.»

«Indeed?» said Mr. Utterson, with a slight change of voice, «and whatwas that?»

«Well, it was this way,» returned Mr. Enfield: «I was coming home fromsome place at the end of the world, about three o’clock of a blackwinter morning, and my way lay through a part of town where there wasliterally nothing to be seen but lamps. Street after street and all thefolks asleep—street after street, all lighted up as if for a processionand all as empty as a church—till at last I got into that state of mindwhen a man listens and listens and begins to long for the sight of apoliceman. All at once, I saw two figures: one a little man who wasstumping along eastward at a good walk, and the other a girl of maybeeight or ten who was running as hard as she was able down a crossstreet. Well, sir, the two ran into one another naturally enough atthe corner; and then came the horrible part of the thing; for the mantrampled calmly over the child’s body and left her screaming on theground. It sounds nothing to hear, but it was hellish to see. It wasn’tlike a man; it was like some damned Juggernaut. I gave a few halloa,took to my heels, collared my gentleman, and brought him back to wherethere was already quite a group about the screaming child. He wasperfectly cool and made no resistance, but gave me one look, so uglythat it brought out the sweat on me like running. The people who hadturned out were the girl’s own family; and pretty soon, the doctor, forwhom she had been sent put in his appearance. Well, the child was notmuch the worse, more frightened, according to the Sawbones; and thereyou might have supposed would be an end to it. But there was one curiouscircumstance. I had taken a loathing to my gentleman at first sight. Sohad the child’s family, which was only natural. But the doctor’s casewas what struck me. He was the usual cut and dry apothecary, of noparticular age and colour, with a strong Edinburgh accent and about asemotional as a bagpipe. Well, sir, he was like the rest of us; everytime he looked at my prisoner, I saw that Sawbones turn sick and whitewith desire to kill him. I knew what was in his mind, just as he knewwhat was in mine; and killing being out of the question, we did the nextbest. We told the man we could and would make such a scandal out of thisas should make his name stink from one end of London to the other. Ifhe had any friends or any credit, we undertook that he should lose them.And all the time, as we were pitching it in red hot, we were keeping thewomen off him as best we could for they were as wild as harpies. I neversaw a circle of such hateful faces; and there was the man in the middle,with a kind of black sneering coolness—frightened too, I could seethat—but carrying it off, sir, really like Satan. `If you choose tomake capital out of this accident,’ said he, `I am naturally helpless.No gentleman but wishes to avoid a scene,’ says he. `Name your figure.’Well, we screwed him up to a hundred pounds for the child’s family; hewould have clearly liked to stick out; but there was something about thelot of us that meant mischief, and at last he struck. The next thing wasto get the money; and where do you think he carried us but to that placewith the door?—whipped out a key, went in, and presently came backwith the matter of ten pounds in gold and a cheque for the balance onCoutts’s, drawn payable to bearer and signed with a name that I can’tmention, though it’s one of the points of my story, but it was a name atleast very well known and often printed. The figure was stiff; but thesignature was good for more than that if it was only genuine. I took theliberty of pointing out to my gentleman that the whole business lookedapocryphal, and that a man does not, in real life, walk into a cellardoor at four in the morning and come out with another man’s cheque forclose upon a hundred pounds. But he was quite easy and sneering. `Setyour mind at rest,’ says he, `I will stay with you till the banks openand cash the cheque myself.’ So we all set off, the doctor, and thechild’s father, and our friend and myself, and passed the rest of thenight in my cham

bers; and next day, when we had breakfasted, went ina body to the bank. I gave in the cheque myself, and said I had everyreason to believe it was a forgery. Not a bit of it. The cheque wasgenuine.»

«Tut-tut,» said Mr. Utterson.

«I see you feel as I do,» said Mr. Enfield. «Yes, it’s a bad story. Formy man was a fellow that nobody could have to do with, a really damnableman; and the person that drew the cheque is the very pink of theproprieties, celebrated too, and (what makes it worse) one of yourfellows who do what they call good. Black mail I suppose; an honest manpaying through the nose for some of the capers of his youth. Black MailHouse is what I call the place with the door, in consequence. Thougheven that, you know, is far from explaining all,» he added, and with thewords fell into a vein of musing.

From this he was recalled by Mr. Utterson asking rather suddenly: «Andyou don’t know if the drawer of the cheque lives there?»

«A likely place, isn’t it?» returned Mr. Enfield. «But I happen to havenoticed his address; he lives in some square or other.»

«And you never asked about the—place with the door?» said Mr. Utterson.

«No, sir: I had a delicacy,» was the reply. «I feel very strongly aboutputting questions; it partakes too much of the style of the day ofjudgment. You start a question, and it’s like starting a stone. You sitquietly on the top of a hill; and away the stone goes, starting others;and presently some bland old bird (the last you would have thought of)is knocked on the head in his own back garden and the family have tochange their name. No sir, I make it a rule of mine: the more it lookslike Queer Street, the less I ask.»

«A very good rule, too,» said the lawyer.

«But I have studied the place for myself,» continued Mr. Enfield. «Itseems scarcely a house. There is no other door, and nobody goes inor out of that one but, once in a great while, the gentleman of myadventure. There are three windows looking on the court on the firstfloor; none below; the windows are always shut but they’re clean. Andthen there is a chimney which is generally smoking; so somebody mustlive there. And yet it’s not so sure; for the buildings are so packedtogether about the court, that it’s hard to say where one ends andanother begins.»

The pair walked on again for a while in silence; and then «Enfield,»said Mr. Utterson, «that’s a good rule of yours.»

«Yes, I think it is,» returned Enfield.

«But for all that,» continued the lawyer, «there’s one point I want toask: I want to ask the name of that man who walked over the child.»

«Well,» said Mr. Enfield, «I can’t see what harm it would do. It was aman of the name of Hyde.»

«Hm,» said Mr. Utterson. «What sort of a man is he to see?»

«He is not easy to describe. There is something wrong with hisappearance; something displeasing, something down-right detestable. Inever saw a man I so disliked, and yet I scarce know why. He must bedeformed somewhere; he gives a strong feeling of deformity, although Icouldn’t specify the point. He’s an extraordinary looking man, and yetI really can name nothing out of the way. No, sir; I can make no hand ofit; I can’t describe him. And it’s not want of memory; for I declare Ican see him this moment.»

Mr. Utterson again walked some way in silence and obviously under aweight of consideration. «You are sure he used a key?» he inquired atlast.

«My dear sir. » began Enfield, surprised out of himself.

«Yes, I know,» said Utterson; «I know it must seem strange. The fact is,if I do not ask you the name of the other party, it is because I knowit already. You see, Richard, your tale has gone home. If you have beeninexact in any point you had better correct it.»

«I think you might have warned me,» returned the other with a touch ofsullenness. «But I have been pedantically exact, as you call it. Thefellow had a key; and what’s more, he has it still. I saw him use it nota week ago.»

Mr. Utterson sighed deeply but said never a word; and the young manpresently resumed. «Here is another lesson to say nothing,» said he. «Iam ashamed of my long tongue. Let us make a bargain never to refer tothis again.»

«With all my heart,» said the lawyer. «I shake hands on that, Richard.»

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